Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Salt on the Walkable Areas

            “Salt of the earth”. An endearing statement conveying to others the helpful demeanor of someone respected; a life wortadsh knowing.

            “Salt on the pathway.” A sometimes necessary practice to help others when traversing your sidewalk and driveway. “Grandma almost slipped and fell, go put some salt down ,on the walkway.”
            It has always been risky business, this throwing salt down on the walks and driveway; of course, it's riskier walking on the ice with no salt. But from a purely horticultural stand point, salt is deadly to plant life. But if some care and common sense is applied, both Grandma and your plant life can be spared a nasty outcome. No one wants a pile of grammas at the bottom of the steps.

 

             Only put down what is needed, the walkways do not need to be totally covered with an inch of salt. If you are thinking that’s what is needed to do an effective job, then putting sand down would suffice.

            If you have salted the walk, and the snow has fallen to a shovelable depth, try and shovel it into areas where there are no plants. I’m not saying you’ve got to lug it a country mile, just try and pile it up in between the plants if you can. If that’s not possible then fling the snow out into the yard; get that first shoveling, where the salt lays most concentrated, to spread out over a larger surface.

            The big thing is  not to go wild with it; put it only where it is needed, and only when it is needed. Teenagers are agile, and if they fall they heal quickly (just kidding), yes, they may need some traction too. But not as much as we old frogs who could snap a hip just getting our coat on before starting the perilous journey to the car.

 



If you have any questions feel free to e-mail me at NiemeyerLandscaping@Gmail.com or post a comment on this Blog. And like us on Facebook at Niemeyer Landscaping. For more Landscape and garden info and pictures on the subject check us out at www.NiemeyerLandscaping.com

 
 

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