Friday, July 25, 2014

There’s Fungus Amongus:

             All those black spotted leaves on your Crab, the Bee Balm with its white powdered leaves are shriveling up, the Garden Phlox with all their spots… It’s been a good year if you’re a fungus spore, a bad year if have eyes in your head. Yes, fungus has reared its leaf crippling head once again.


            Every year you think the next won’t be as bad as this year was; but it is. You made sure you raked up all the leaves, hoping against hope that all the fungi spores were on the leaves you’ve hauled way, but the following year shows you otherwise; dandruff on the Bee Balm, and enough spots on your Crabs to impress a Dalmatian.

           What am I doing wrong!?! You might be saying.
            Possibly nothing, but more than likely, it could be this.

            Just because you’ve raked up all the diseased leaves, doesn’t mean you’ve cleaned up all the fungus. It is very possible that your vigorous raking has knocked off a bunch of the fungus spores; and now they are waiting patiently for spring, and a good healthy wind to pick them up and once again rejoin them with the leaves of your trees or perennials.

            I would suggest you heavily spray the ground around your problem plants with a good all-purpose fungicide. This should kill anything fungus spores hiding out. I would also do this next spring as well.

            There is no guarantee you will be fungus free, some plants are just susceptible to these parasites, but you will diminish their numbers. Do this consistently year after year and who knows, you could get the upper hand on this bane.

            If you have any questions feel free to e-mail me at NiemeyerLandscaping@Gmail.com or post a comment on this Blog. And like us on Facebook at Niemeyer Landscaping. For more Landscape and garden info and pictures on the subject check us out at www.NiemeyerLandscaping.com

Thursday, July 24, 2014

More Roses Please!


            When most plants produce a seed, or seeds, their reason for flower production comes to an end. The whole reason for flowers, in their world, is not to look pretty for you; but to attract  bees, butterflies or humming birds for reproduction purposes. Once that is accomplished there is no reason to grind out any more flowers.

            Those little seed balls that form on your roses after the flower pedals have dropped off are the result of a fertilized flower; if you cut those off, or better yet remove the spent flower before this little seed ball starts to grow, you will force your rose to keep on blooming.

            If you are faithful in doing this your roses will produce a boatload of flowers. But with this excessive flower production comes an excessive draining of nutrients in the ground around them. Some Rose Food will need to be added, as the instructions on the bag or box will indicate, in order to keep them clamoring to produce.

 

             If you have any questions feel free to e-mail me at NiemeyerLandscaping@Gmail.com or post a comment on this Blog. And like us on Facebook at Niemeyer Landscaping. For more Landscape and garden info and pictures on the subject check us out at www.NiemeyerLandscaping.com

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

My Spireas Look Dead

            The Spirea is one of the few landscape plants that can be rejuvenated by cutting it all the way down to the ground.

            In time a Spirea can get woody and sparse. Branches die, or just get to old to produce much in the way of flowers, or leaves for that matter. Regular pruning just doesn’t cut it anymore; there just isn’t enough at the tips to produce a lush bush. So, more drastic measures need to be employed.
 

            It’s quite simple; you just whack it down to the ground and start over.

            You must realize at this point that you now have a new bush with new growth coming up; it’s not going to be thick and full right off the bat, you will have to train it back to its former glory.

            Let this new growth grow up about a foot and then remove about three inches. This will halt the forward growth and cause the plant to push out side growth. Let this new growth get about six inches and prune off about two inches. Let this new growth get about six inches long and prune that back a couple inches. Now, about four to five months since the whack down, you should have your Spirea back, younger and full of new wood ready to produce a gob of flowers again. 

             If you have any questions feel free to e-mail me at NiemeyerLandscaping@Gmail.com or post a comment on this Blog. And like us on Facebook at Niemeyer Landscaping. For more Landscape and garden info and pictures on the subject check us out at www.NiemeyerLandscaping.com

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

What is a Weed?

           What is a weed? "A weed is a plant not belonging in its present location."


            Does this mean that if you are growing Dandelions and a Rose pops upon the middle of them, the Rose a weed? Roses are exempt from this rule. But, if a Carnation or a Black-eyed- Susan, or some other perennial rears up and says “look at me”, it’s a weed; but pulling it is up to you.

            Back to the weeds… You have two options: pulling or spraying. Pulling is back breaking work, and takes a while, but you do feel like you’ve accomplished something, the weeds are gone. But are they…………?

            Spraying Weed-b-gon or Roundup will kill them root and all; but in order to know if they all perished, you will need a week.

            I think the spraying route is still the best, because it kills the plant root and all; if you pull the weed and leave some of the root in the ground it will come back.

            Just remember Roundup kills everything in the plant world! Weed-b-gon will not kill grass or grasses, just broad leaf weeds.

            So, if you want to win the war on weeds keep a spray bottle of Roundup handy and spray the weeds you see, don’t pull them.

Monday, July 21, 2014

Witchbrooming:

            This is what happens when you just buzz off the overgrowth on Burning Bush, Lilacs, Weigela, and many others year after year. After a while you will need to go in a little deeper and cut out “Broomhilda’s” supply of traveling apparati.



            Yes it will look bad for a month or so, but it will grow back, and be more manageable. And yes you will have to do it again in five years or so.

 

             If you have any questions feel free to e-mail me at NiemeyerLandscaping@Gmail.com or post a comment on this Blog. And like us on Facebook at Niemeyer Landscaping. For more Landscape and garden info and pictures on the subject check us out at www.NiemeyerLandscaping.com

Friday, July 18, 2014

Pool Discharge Water:

           Pools are for Summer and draw people and like ants to a wet sucker. I would like to bring to your attention the discharge water they throw to keep themselves clean.


            Every so often the filters need to be back washed so their effectiveness remains high. This water needs to be pumped somewhere, and most times it is allowed to run out where it is convenient; and this possibly is right into a landscaped area.

            At first you may think that everything is just getting an extra drink; but an extra drink of what? Yes it is water but water with high doses of chlorine in it, plant killing chlorine.

            “Oh, so that’s why everything died over there”

            Getting rid of the discharge water can be a bit of a trick, and does involve some planning. Usually getting it to flow into your sewer isn’t practical due to distance, so other alternatives need to be considered. However you do it, just know that if your plants are in the line of fire they will die. Better to create a decretive stone area for it to flow into, or a hidden place it can be piped to. Or if there is no other place some of your plants may have to give up their lives for your fun and frolic; and with the heat that is coming again I believe that will be a fair trade off.


If you have any questions feel free to contact me at NiemeyerLandscaping@Gmail.com or post a comment on this Blog. More gardening and landscaping tips can be viewed in the Advance weekly paper, or like us on Facebook at Niemeyer Landscaping.

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Tomato Picking (part 3)


            To start you will need a Coca-Cola can. Next, take it out to your garden and hold it up to your tomato vines; pick only those round object that are the same color as the can.

            If your tomatoes are hard and crunchy it is not entirely your fault, for it is possible that the coca-cola product you brought out into the garden with you was a can of Sprite.



   If you have questions: NiemeyerLandscaping@gmail.com A You Tube enhanced version of this article is on our WEB site at www.NiemeyerLandscaping.com. along with a daily gardening Blog with timely information. Also, like us on Facebook at Niemeyer Landscaping.