Sunday, May 29, 2016

Tomato Planting Tips


           When you plant your tomatoes strip off a couple of the bottom leaves and plant then deep; the hairs on the stem will turn into roots and give your plant a better, stronger root base.

            Cut Worms take bites out of young seedlings thus ending the plants life. Plastic drinking straws, (bigger the better) will be your answer to this dilemma.  Cuts them a 1 ½” long and slits them up the side. Because they are slit they will not constrict the plant as it grows.

Tuesday, May 10, 2016

Frost

 
            Early May in Michigan is always a time for botanical Russian Roulette .We get so sick of the cold weather that when a little warmth comes of way we think it’s here to stay, and off to the flower store we go.

             In all my years as a kid watching Tarzan I never saw him swinging through the jungle wearing a parka and mukluks; he was always sporting a loincloth. He’d swing with Cheetah on his back wearing it, he’d drop down out of the trees to greet passers-by wearing it, and he even went into town with only that on. If you looked in his closet that’s all you would have seen, an array of loincloths; and why? Because it was hot where he was. Sure he experienced 45 degree temperature swings but in his neck of the jungle it went from 120 down to 75; not 75 to 30, like around here.

 
            The new annuals you bought are plants that come from that part of the world. They watched Tarzan wrestle alligators, they watch him swing over to Jane’s place wearing his new Armani loincloth. And they too haven’t packed any winter wear when taking that trip to your house.

            Our weather zone is 6, and zone 6 puts the last frost date at May 15. As we have seen with this weekend it is “chancy” to plant anything tropical here before that date. Keep those plant covers handy for a while yet.

If you have any questions feel free to e-mail me at NiemeyerLandscaping@Gmail.com or post a comment on this Blog. And like us on Facebook at Niemeyer Landscaping. For more Landscape and garden info and pictures on the subject check us out at www.NiemeyerLandscaping.com

Hummingbirds are back!

Hey! The Hummingbirds are back! First one to get their feeders out wins!! And what do they win Johnny? Well, let me tell you; they win a summer of simple enjoyment as they watch one of God’s truly marvelous flying machines flit from feeder to feeder. Yes “feeders”, the more you put out the more birds you’ll attract.

           Remember also that the “water to sugar” ration is 3 to 1. They will know if you’re being stingy with the sweet stuff; and if you are they will pass you by.

            Let me put this in perspective for you. A Ruby Throat hummingbird must consume 3 to 4 grams of food a day in order to maintain flight and life; and not just any food, it must be high octane fuel food, no fluff stuff. That means if you were this bird, at your size now, you would have to consume 300 pounds of food per day to do what this little bird needs to do all day. That, my friend is a lot of grub. That’s 300 quarter pounders at McDonald’s, bun and all.

             So, don’t skimp on the sugar!

If you have any questions feel free to e-mail me at NiemeyerLandscaping@Gmail.com or post a comment on this Blog. And like us on Facebook at Niemeyer Landscaping. For more Landscape and garden info and pictures on the subject check us out at www.NiemeyerLandscaping.com

Friday, May 6, 2016

Flooding

           Sounds like we are in for some rain over the next day or two; rain enough to test the water tightness of anybody’s basement.


            Most problems stem from the fact that the ground settles around the foundation over time, causing water to flow back in toward the foundation walls. Filling in these low spots, and actually mounding it some, will force the water to obey the laws of physics and keep its distance from the wall.

            Even better, if the problem is severe, lay some plastic on this incline and anchor it down with 1-2” stone. Even better yet, if the problem is of Noahatic proportions, establish drain tile at the base of this slope and get the water to run a safe distance away.

If you have any questions feel free to e-mail me at NiemeyerLandscaping@Gmail.com or post a comment on this Blog. And like us on Facebook at Niemeyer Landscaping. For more Landscape and garden info and pictures on the subject check us out at www.NiemeyerLandscaping.com

Monday, May 2, 2016

Crabicide and Fertilizer:

            There are two ways you can buy Crabicide, with fertilizer or without fertilizer. I’m not sure which is the best, but here’s my thought.


            The fertilizer addition in the crabicide blend is not as strong in the Nitrogen department as the typical summer grass food bag boasts; nitrogen is the food that makes the plant grow and the nitrogen in the crabicide bag is about half. This is good because the grass is just now waking up; how hungry are you when your peepers open as slits at six in the morning? You’ve got to get moving a bit before you’re rummaging around for some breakfast. To spring the high nitrogen fertilizer on your lawn this time of year, is to have someone wheel the buffet buckboard into your bedroom, and force you to eat it all now before you’ve even had a chance to wipe the sleepers out of your eyes.

            I think just the plain Crabicide is all your yard really needs; give it a chance to wake up a bit before you cram the whole “pig on a spit” down their throats.

If you have any questions feel free to e-mail me at NiemeyerLandscaping@Gmail.com or post a comment on this Blog. And like us on Facebook at Niemeyer Landscaping. For more Landscape and garden info and pictures on the subject check us out at www.NiemeyerLandscaping.com

Friday, April 29, 2016

Asparagus

            Well I think it is time to start mentioning things that could be done in the garden or landscape. Spring is here, how do I know this? I'm starting to check the garden for the first vegetable of the season.

            So let’s start with “A” for “Asparagus”, if your ground has thawed enough that is.


            Asparagus needs sandier soils in areas exposed to the full sun; clay soils are out of the question; clay doesn’t drain well. You can create a sandier environment in clay however, but it takes a lot of work. Dig the trench 16 inches wide by 20 inches deep with a perforated drainage tile in the bottom of the trench; do not use any of the clay as backfill. For those blessed with good drainable soil the trench or trenches you dig are 12 inches deep by 12 inches wide.

            Once dug, put a three inch layer of composted manure in the bottom, and mix it well into the soil. Take the Asparagus crowns and place them in the trench 18 inches apart; multiple trenches should be spaced three feet apart. Cover them with two inches of sifted compost humus soil and water in well. Throughout the summer the trench should be filled in gradually with an original topsoil / compost mix. If these directions are followed you will have a viable asparagus bed for years and years and years.

The big temptation, this year and the following spring, will be picking the new spears. Don’t give in to this, the roots need these first year spears to grow up and develop into fronds that catch the sunlight and strengthen the root for next year’s production.
            Picking in the second year can happen until they get “pencil thin”. Once pencil thin, stop! Let these grow up and become energy suppliers for the root. As the years click by the picking season will get longer and longer, leveling off in about five to six years. But the “pencil thin” rule still applies; I can’t stress enough that you need some summer growth to rejuvenate the crowns for next year.

If you have any questions feel free to e-mail me at NiemeyerLandscaping@Gmail.com or post a comment on this Blog. And like us on Facebook at Niemeyer Landscaping. For more Landscape and garden info and pictures on the subject check us out at www.NiemeyerLandscaping.com

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Tulips: The real Story


It is Tulip Time! .

       But did you know that tulips are not a native of Holland? They originally came from China, and made their way to the Netherlands through the enterprising ways of the Dutch trading folks. And they capitalized on this bulb grown flower’s marketing ability so well that you thought they originated in the land of the windmills and wooden shoes.



If you have any questions feel free to e-mail me at NiemeyerLandscaping@Gmail.com or post a comment on this Blog. And like us on Facebook at Niemeyer Landscaping. For more Landscape and garden info and pictures on the subject check us out at www.NiemeyerLandscaping.com